We’ve changed — I hope that’s constant — Ukrainian social ad two years ago. How could we do that? We did that creating really good social ad that would be the ad outdoor agencies would fight to place on their billboards pro bono — that means free. Why was I silent for two years? I could find right words to describe the huge amount of work done. Now when I found them I was happy to write share the knowledge.

Back in 2010 before annual flu epidemic the leaflet of Ministry of Health caught my sight. It was about washing hands and ventilation. Printed on a worst recycled paper you could imagine and illustrated with poor quality images it was useless. It didn’t answer the questions “What to do if I got sick?”, “Is it a flu?”, “Is it a bird, is it a plane or is it a superman flu?” etc. Month later UNICEF Ukraine offered to create a campaign about flu epidemic prevention. Based on the mood of people we couldn’t say “flu” as this word was discredited and none would pay any attention to this messages. People thought that ignoring the problem would make it non-existent.

The first thing that was done with campaign was definition of the main ways people nowadays get a flu. We (me, Alex and Olena) did that while eating pizza, not during focus groups or studies. It was obvious that (my quote): “If they would stay at home with running noses instead of going to the offices, everything would be better!” That’s how the main slogan of “Simple things that can save your life” campaign was born — “Got sick? Stay at home!”

Got sick? Stay at home! Simple things that can save your life (on the blue background)

We didn’t stop with just that eye catching message and more messages describing what to do came:

Clear hands anytime anywhere. Sleep well, eat well, avoid overstrain. Avoid crowds. Keep your distance from the sick person. Simple things that can save your life (on the blue background)

Original approach, pictograms as illustrations and short but absolute messages made their work and reached the audience. Ukrainian Railways asked for special edition of the posters to hang them in trains. There were also made special versions for subway, hospitals and clinics

While the first wave of the campaign was one we shoot some videos with live people who should represent the messages in the second wave of the campaign, supported by their presence on outdoor surfaces.

Clear hands anytime anywhere. Sleep well, eat well, avoid overstrain. Avoid crowds. Keep your distance from the sick person. Got sick? Stay at home! Simple things that can save your life (on the blue background)

While writing copy texts for posters Olena Bo, with tons of information and corrections of infectionist Dr. Kateryna Bulavinova, who controlled the whole process so we communicated only correct information, wrote clear and useful texts about defining if you had a flu, what you should do about it and how to prevent getting sick. I did the sweet leaflet out of them.

[Download leaflet](http://genn.org/junk/unicef/leaflet.pdf) (PDF, about 2 Mb, in Ukrainian)

When Ukrainian Ministry of Health spotted the leaflet they were so amazed, we were asked to place their logo on it. Thus the leaflet became the official propaganda of Ministry of Health.

Later we god some awards on the festival of social ads but I think of another thing as of the best reward. The fact is that campaign was made in 2010 for 2010 but is still reprinted and placed on the bill boards, city lights, train stations or in subway trains makes me proud and happy. We don’t do anything to support it. We’ve just made the awesome campaign. Here I must mention that Anna Sukhodolska of UNICEF Ukraine didn’t just accepted the idea and decided to start the campaign but also was patient with us ;)

✖✖✖

Once my friend, who found out I made “Got sick? Stay at home!” campaign, asked me to make A4 sized poster for her. She decided to print it and place near the working place of those, who came to the office sick (download poster, PDF, in Ukrainian). It was downloaded thousands times to the moment.